Marrubium vulgare

origin : Croatia

 

Candy made with dried Horehound Herb is mentioned briefly in the 1961 novel

Where The Red Fern Grows; those of you who have read the book may recall the protagonist's description of his grandfather's store and the various sweets he kept in stock. This however is not the most common use of the organic herbs that botanists know as Marrubium vulgare.

The name of Horehound Herb has little to do with hunting dogs, although the first element is derived from the ancient Anglo-Saxon word for "white-haired." Horehound Herb is in fact one of many medicinal herbs indigenous to the British Isles, and was introduced around the world by European colonists between the 17th and mid-19th centuries.

It is essentially a weed, although gardeners in the rural areas of England's Midlands District frequently cultivate bulk herbs such as Horehound Herb for use in tea and candy making. The scientific name for Horehound Herb, Marrubium vulgare, may be derived from the old Roman town of Maria Urbs; alternatively, it may also be named for the Marrobus Water of the Bible, a bitter juice used by the Hebrews and made from the bitter herbs eaten during Passover. In ancient times, it  was thought to be an antidote for plant-based toxins and poisonous snakes. 

 

MAIN ACTIONS :

  • bitter tonic
  • antiasthmatic
  • antidiabetic
  • antitussive
  • cholagogue
  • diaphoretic
  • demulcent
  • emmenagogue
  • expectorant
  • immune stimulant
  • pectoral
  • stomachic
  • vermifuge
  • vulnerary

 

ENERGETICS :

  • hot + dry

 

Warning : Excessive use may overstimulate the heart and cause arrhythmias.

Do not take if pregnant or breast feeding.

Horehound

$7.00Price
weight
  • This information has not been evaluated by the Food and Drug Administration and is for educational purposes only. This information is not intended to prevent, diagnose, treat, or cure any disease or condition.

    In addition, many herbs are not safe in pregnancy, lactation, children, and in certain health conditions.

    When using plants medicinally, please check with your licensed healthcare provider. In addition, strongly consider working with a trained herbalist.